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Gogo Varzelioti
Lecturer

 

Office 916, 9th floor, School of Philosophy

Office Hours:  Tuesday 12.00-14.00 and Wednesday 15.00-17.00

Phone: 210-7277470 
E-mail: gvarzel[at]theatre.uoa[dot]gr

 

Gogo Varzelioti is a Lecturer at the Department of Theatre Studies, University of Athens. She obtained a BA, a MA and a PhD (2006) in Theatre Studies from the University of Athens (Theatre Studies Dept.). Her thesis was published in 2011 by the Hellenic Institute of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice (under the title Cretan Comedy and everyday life: The relation between stage image and society in the Venetian ruled Candia, Athens-Venice 2011).

She has been a Research Scholar at the Hellenic Institute of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice (1999-2002). In the context of her scholarship, she conducted research in the archives and libraries of the city, in order to write her PhD thesis, as well as she participated in the process of cataloguing and classification of the Hellenic Institute of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice’s Old Archive. Later, she carried out research missions to the Vatican City (Archive of the Propaganda Fede: 2002, 2003). She has collaborated with the Academy of Athens, Center of Research for Medieval and Modern Hellenism (2004-2009, member of a research team) and the Institute of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice in the area of publications (2004-2009, 2012). During the years 2003, 2005, 2007, 2011, she travelled to Venice and conducted research at the State Archives, the Marciana Library, the Archive and the Library of the Institute Carlo Goldoni, the Museo Correr and the Giorgio Cini Foundation.

She has participated in Greek and international conferences and she has published papers in scientific journals, congress proceedings and collective volumes.

Her research interests focus on the theatre history and the study of society and culture in the Latin-dominated Greece (Crete, Ionian and Aegean islands) during the Early Modern Period (16th-18th centuries).